About your Search

20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
collapse. any time you go to europe, i love europe. i'm not going to talk about the chocolate makers, but when you go to europe and especially great britain, you don't get the sense of optimism you don't get when you land back here in america. i heard you talk about the force multiplier. you multiply that 300 million times over, what a powerful force. >> i spend a lot of time out in the countryside talking to all kinds of audiences. trade associations and financial organizations and they are all worried about the economy and the unemployment rate. they haven't lost confidence. they are hustling and trying to make a living so that people make a better living for their families. don't count this place out. it will never be out. >> the second rule runs counter to what the reality is in washington right now. get mad and then get over it. you talked about how politics is not a zero sum game. your friend 90% of the time is not your enemy 10% of the time. >> i tell a story about a disagreement i had back in 2003 over the iraq war. france was against us going to war and we were against franc
conquered. he liberated europe. he didn't need it. teddy roosevelt's an interesting example. he got war out of his system by charging up san juan hill as a young man. he was the ultimate war lover. nobody loved war more than teddy roosevelt. he was almost completely crazy about it, but he got it out of his system by doing it himself. and when he became president, you know, he talked about speak softly but carry a big stick, the great white fleet and he believed in power, but he was not desperate to rush into a war because he had already proved himself. >> which then leads us to what we see today and what is coming out of the wars that we're in today. obviously president obama's history, his story is not over yet. evan, you were talking about presidents driven by a high-minded ideology. what is president obama's as he tries to draw down yet goes in with these firm strikes? >> he just wants to get out. all this talk about nation building and helping afghanistan become a real country, they're not talking about that now. they just want out. they don't want to have al qaeda over there but -- >>
it was possible to just keep giving in to him, so that he would not carry out his plans to conquer europe. that's where the word "appeaseme "appeasement" really was the strongest and is really the indictment about how the western powers behave. >> first of all, what year did you flee check slozechoslovakic? >> in march of '39. >> and how old were you? >> i was 2. >> and my father was a member of the check slovak diplomatic service. and he was out of belgrade when i was born. >> did your father know mika's uncle, grand uncle, i guess who was president of czechoslovakia? >> definitely. he worked for them, and he felt very strongly -- czechoslovakia was a very interesting place in the interwar period. it was the only functioning democracy. it was created in a large part because of woodrow wilson's policies is and the constitution was modeled on the american one, except one big thing, it had an equal rights amendment in it, even then. and basically, there was a desire by people like my father, who was in his early 30s, to try to make sure that czechoslovakia stayed democratic. so he then left, he w
the fiscal cliff will impact europe and vice versa. two years ago, the people of bp made a commitment to the gulf. bp has paid over twenty-three billion dollars to help those affected and to cover cleanup costs. today, the beaches and gulf are open, and many areas are reporting their best tourism seasons in years. and bp's also committed to america. we support nearly 250,000 jobs and invest more here than anywhere else. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. our commitment has never been stronger. we create easy-to-use, powerful trading tools for all. look at these streaming charts! they're totally customizable and they let you visualize what might happen next. that's genius! we knew you needed a platform that could really help you elevate your trading. so we built it. chances of making this? it's a lot easier to find out if a trade is potentially profitable. just use our trade & probability calculator and there it is. for all the reasons you trade options - from income to risk management to diversification - you'll have the tools to get it done. strategies. chains. po
's europe, and they're blaming the fact that their economies aren't going based on the fact that we're in this stalemate. you know, it's huge. >> harold, i mean, it all comes down to leadership. you know, when you talk to business owners, they want leadership shown. i'm glad the president is talking to business leaders now. >> and a debater on the phone. >> not only the administration but also on the other side of pennsylvania avenue with the republicans and harry reid in the senate. you're just not seeing it. >> you don't see enough of it. curiously, the markets -- investors are actually increasing their exposure which is kind of contrarian to your point. i do believe to julia's point, you'll see a receding or retreat in that attitude over the next several days and few week ifs we can't get ourselves closer. i remain optimistic. the president wants a legacy and his legacy depends on this. and two proposals have been put forth. they resemble each other in terms of the amount they've asked for. i give republicans credit. they understand revenue has to be part of the deal. the questio
to tackle in the next year on or so. >> what about europe? will the euro zone up stick together and will the uk start part of the union? david cameron said in the last couple of days there may need fob a referendum on that. >> the euro zone will stick together. they made a decision through this year. they made a decision to keep themselves together, and britain be want to be a fully fledged member of the european union and not of the euro zone. we don't have to merge our kurn stee, we don't have to american our budget policies, we don't have to do all the things they need to do to make their currency work. by the way, alexander hamilton taught us all you need to do to make single currency work a couple years ago. >> here's a point of view from the upcoming issue of the new york magazine. this is adam davidson saying god save the british economy. as long as it continues -- >> i wonder where this will go? >> as long as as it continues, it offers crucial lesson for the united states. so far austerity has not significantly improved economic health. the plan to shrink the size of gov
. all the armies of europe and asia could not by force take a drink from the ohio river or make a track on the blue ridge in the trial of a thousand years. no, if destruction be our lot, we must ourselves be its author and its finisher. as a nation of free men, we will live forever or die by suicide." for the sake of my four children and yours, i choose life, and i choose change. it's time to turn over the tables inside the temple. and for the sake of our children, we must do what's right. and for the sake of this great nation that we love, let's pray to god that we do. >>> and coming up, we have connecticut senator richard blumenthal who will join us. he swent 30 years working in law enforcement in connecticut before he joined the u.s. senate. he is also a father of four, like joe. he joins us this morning with his unique perspective on the events in newtown. also ahead this morning, we'll hear from some of the teachers who were inside sandy hook elementary school when the shooting began. we'll also bring in mike barnicle, jon meacham and willie geist who spent part of the weekend in n
of a sensible attitude in europe and the uk about cost reduction. as i said, i had two children there. i had fantastic care, top quality care, up until the moment i had a healthy kid, and then that's where you start to see the cost cutting. you go into a room with 20 other people. that's okay, if that means everybody can have their pregnancy paid for, that's a great tradeoff. >> let me ask you a real time question here in the united states of america. we'll use my mother as an example. she lived to be 94 years of age. the last year of her life, she was fairly healthy until the last two or three months of her life when her pacemaker, problem with that, pneumonia, a stroke. she was back in the hospital on the average of every two weeks. i would take her back to the hospital. who gets penalized in a case like that? the hospital, the patient, who gets penalized? >> in this case, it would be the hospital. that's what's changing now. they're looking at ways to try to prevent people from continually coming back. this lady is not at the end of her life. she has some chronic conditions, but if you wa
. heard from boehner and geithner that you talked about but, listen, some things looking better in europe this morning actually. i know it's boring but the greek deal looks a little more likely. germany making positive comments so stock futures are up. big story in "the wall street journal" about how the rest of the world is slow to get on the natural gas bandwagon which could be good for the united states and canada because they need gas around the world which means we may be the more likely go-to source and delta airlines reportedly in the hunt for half a stake in virgin atlantic. they covet some new landing spots at heathrow airport. barnicle can fly back and forth on london to get a new castle or a guinness or whatever his choice is. and i'm going to leave you with this. it is the 20th birthday of the text message. on this date 20 years ago, it was created. and now university students send an average of 3,200 text messages per month rof, lol, omg. >> brian, quickly, back to the virgin atlantic/delta story, if that goes through, any estimate on the amount of bags that the combined airl
of western europe, coming in and making a plea. i'm really surprised that this was killed by fringe concerns, fringe, fringe concerns. >> and it was, in fact, his fellow senators, several of the people who served with bob dole, who were the key votes here. and john kerry was leading it on the floor with john mccain. it was one of those bipartisan coalitions of veterans, wounded veterans, mccain and others, and the wounded warriors. the chamber of commerce. this is basically to take the american standard that bush 41 passed. it was his bill. >> george bush. >> george bush 41's bill spread it to the rest of the world. his son, george w., approved this treaty. it was sent up by president obama in '09, the senate foreign relations committee passed it easily, and then these republicans abandoned it on the floor. people are crying on the senate floor. >> john mccain gave such a passionate speech. so you have, mike barnicle, american hero, war veteran, john mccain, talking about how we help the disabled across the world with weeping american heroes who were wounded in war, watching. you have the st
at the mediterranean today up north in europe, you're seeing the european supernational state break apart. and to the south, you're seeing the arab nation state system break apart. these are two great system. and that tells me one thing. we need to get our act together. we need to be as resilient as possible because the whole world is depending on us. we're one of the last rocks of stability out there. >> thomas friedman thank you so much. we'll be reading your column online at nytimes.com. carl bernstein and richard wolffe, stay with us if you can. >>> next, the man at the center of the union fight in michigan who signed the right-to-work measure into law. governor rick snyder joins us next. why he says it was the unions who started this fight. >>> and a little later, harvey weinstein will be here on set to discuss tonight's big benefit concert for hurricane sandy relief. you're watching "morning joe" brewed by starbucks. we're at walmart with the simmons family. how much is your current phone bill? four sixteen seventy six a month! okay, come with me -- we're gonna save you money. with
essentially sort it out without us. we do not want asia to begin to look like europe did a century ago. i'm simply saying that the tectonic plates are moving. >> shifting. >> we have got to pay more attention to this part of the world. >> all right, richard. and with you here, we will be given no choice but to do exactly that. >> thank you, joe. >> thank you. i want those tickets. >> there will be a lot more time spent discussing north korea. >> very good. thank you. you guys were talking about a report, harold, seriously by, what, 2035? >> 2030. asia. >> dominate. >> will be bigger than u.s. and european economies combined. >> i don't believe it. >> this is a u.s. intelligence report. >> i know. i know. i'm just saying, i'm ever the optimist. i think we're going -- this country's going to figure out a way forward, and we're going to turn it around. david, "meet the press: 65 years of history in the making, volume 1." i can't wait. tell us about this, please. >> well, the way it's broken up is interesting is by major events in the history covered by the program. you know, e-books are, you
is that the major regions, especially the u.s., europe, china, india get together and say, come on, we're all facing these disasters and if we do that, you know, we have a chance because the other major theme of this report they think is absolutely right is, the irony is that we're sitting on the most incredible explosion of great technology that we have already seen in decades, if not a century plus. all the information technology, all the health technology, the genomics. but to solve our real problems requires kind of thinking ahead, which has not been our strong suit in recent years. >> we haven't strategized as to how to work together. >> exactly. >> we talk a lot here about income disparity in this country, what about the disparity in incomes in terms of the income level t united states compared to other countries, how are we doing on that level in terms of our income? >> well, you know, the u.s. has had growth over the years from two centuries now, 200 years of growing at about 2 percentage points per year, over two centuries that adds up to make us a very rich country. other countries now tha
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)